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Ladies and Gents 1940’s Dubious Clothing

It has come to our attention here at Mapledoram that there is a lot of monkey business going on with vintage 1940’s clothing.

Let us start by clearing up a few things, Antique is anything that is hundred years or over.

Vintage is anything from 1920-1980 and anything after that may be described as retro and that covers a multitude of sins.

We see a lot of clothing with what looks like an original CC41 label inside and the clothing looks right as well. For the aficionados and sticklers amongst you, be wary of 195o’s clothing that looks right but has been tampered with, i.e. has had an aged “1940’s” label sewn inside.

There are many fakes about and not easy to spot you need to know what you are looking for and do your research.

The main giveaway is attention to detail and the cut of the clothing, remember the average height for a man in the war years was 5’7” and had 37” chest and 34” waist, for women the average height was 5’4” and statics of 33-21-33, so consider this when you find that perfect immaculate suit with correct labelling and in a large size, they are as rare as hen’s teeth.

Most simple clothing during the war was handmade and did not have labels inside, woollen garments were usually hand knitted, dresses and blouses were handmade from patterns.

Ladies and gents suits from 1941 were subject to CC41 regulations, which controlled the amount of material used and therefore dictated some of the fashion and style of the day.

If Zips were used they would have certainly been metal and not all gents suits were button fly’s or button braces. It was not uncommon for a man to wear both a belt and braces at the same time.

Whilst here at Mapledoram we do not claim to be experts, we are all too happy to do our research and provide the best advice to our customers.

At the end of the day the main thing is to have fun and enjoy the events.

 

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Events 2017

Events List 2017
March 19th – Victoria Baths Manchester
April 9th – Leeds, location tbc
April 30th- Harrogate, Cedar Court Hotel
May 19th-21st Haworth 1940’s Weekend
May 27th-29th East Lancashire Railway 1940’s Weekend
June 2nd-4th Great Central Railway 1940’s Weekend
July 24th& 25th June or 1st& 2nd June Severn Valley Railway 1940’s weekend
July 15th& 16th Black Country Living Museum 1940’s Weekend
July 22nd & 23rd Leyburn 1940’s Weekend
August 11th-13th York in the Blitz
September 8th-10th The Goodwood Revival (Stand 188)
13th-15th October Pickering 1940’s Weekend

1940s

Welcome

Welcome to the first Mapledoram blog on our new website. This will be a bi-monthly edition and will cover any subject to do with 1940’s fashion, style, facts and in addition ours and our readers views on subjects.  Kicking off this week is one that is close to my heart, that is the wearing of hats by gentleman indoors at 1940’s events.

Let us be clear it is not, nor has it ever been acceptable for a gentleman to wear his hat in doors and certainly not in front of ladies.  Only on certain occasions is this acceptable from an etiquette point of view and is usually connected to the military on ceremonial occasions.  If you are at a dance, dinner or party, no self-respecting gentleman would keep their hat on indoors.  The second thing we are constantly asked about is that of swing shoes/ two tone dance shoes with 1940’s suits.

It is safe to say that it was not an everyday sight of gentleman wearing dance shoes on the streets during the day in 1940’s Great Britain.  By all means have your dance shoes ready for the night-time but keep them under wraps until such time.  There are plenty of shoes that fit the day time bill and gentleman should stick to dark coloured traditional stitched through the welt shoes, of the plain oxford toe cap, plain oxford, and brogue or oxford brogue variety.

It is attention to detail that creates the look of a 1940’s outfit and whilst it need not cost a fortune, small details can make or break the outfit.  Thank you for taking the time to read our first blog and if you wish ask us questions or contribute feel free to do so.

Best wishes, Gary